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Canada’s happy province


It is nearly 50 years ago.

The Smallwood administration is telling us that we are a happy province — so happy, presumably, that we have earmarked 1966 as a “Come Home Year.”

We want to show ex-pats what we have achieved in the 17 years that we have been a Canadian province. I believe that what sparked the earmarking of 1966 was the completion of our part of the Trans Canada Highway the year before.

A large format (9” by 11”) softcover book was issued in 1966 to sound the trumpet.

It was entitled “Newfoundland Canada’s Happy Province” and it contained 164 pages, 99 per cent photographs.

 It also contained 60 pages of advertising which showcased many, perhaps all, of our largest companies at the time.

Doubtless, as the book was the baby of Joseph Smallwood, few of those approached for an ad would have refused.

In his postscript to the book, Smallwood credited the Canadian federal system with Newfoundland's remarkable progress from 1949-65.

But he said we were determined not to become “sort of a ward of Ottawa. … It makes me think,” Smallwood wrote, “of the line that Billy Sunday's singer used to utter: ‘Brighten the corner where you are!’ ”

 True to its source then, this column is mostly pictures.

 

Paul Sparkes is a longtime journalist intrigued by the history of Newfoundland and Labrador. E-mail: psparkes@thetelegram.com

 

 

The Smallwood administration is telling us that we are a happy province — so happy, presumably, that we have earmarked 1966 as a “Come Home Year.”

We want to show ex-pats what we have achieved in the 17 years that we have been a Canadian province. I believe that what sparked the earmarking of 1966 was the completion of our part of the Trans Canada Highway the year before.

A large format (9” by 11”) softcover book was issued in 1966 to sound the trumpet.

It was entitled “Newfoundland Canada’s Happy Province” and it contained 164 pages, 99 per cent photographs.

 It also contained 60 pages of advertising which showcased many, perhaps all, of our largest companies at the time.

Doubtless, as the book was the baby of Joseph Smallwood, few of those approached for an ad would have refused.

In his postscript to the book, Smallwood credited the Canadian federal system with Newfoundland's remarkable progress from 1949-65.

But he said we were determined not to become “sort of a ward of Ottawa. … It makes me think,” Smallwood wrote, “of the line that Billy Sunday's singer used to utter: ‘Brighten the corner where you are!’ ”

 True to its source then, this column is mostly pictures.

 

Paul Sparkes is a longtime journalist intrigued by the history of Newfoundland and Labrador. E-mail: psparkes@thetelegram.com

 

 

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