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Updated: Changes at college a good business decision: Byrnes


From a business perspective, Bob Byrnes believes the College of the North Atlantic is doing exactly what it needs to do by making changes to programming.

Byrnes, the president of the Bay St. George Chamber of Commerce, made the comment following an address by Ann Marie Vaughan, the college’s president and chief executive officer, to the chamber Friday.

Vaughan told those in attendance that two “centres of excellence” are being created, including one for heavy equipment industrial trades and the other for media arts programs. It will mean training opportunities for 250-300 more students at the Bay St. George campus, she said, and nine new positions will be created in Stephenville, mainly in the heavy equipment programs.

The creation of the media arts centre, however, will mean some programs at Bay St. George campus will be moving to the college’s campus in St. John’s. Vaughn said college administration met with all instructors of the affected programs and they are well aware of what’s taking place and were actually part of the process.

Byrnes said the business community will see an immediate impact from the extra students, while additional administration positions at campus headquarters in Stephenville will be another advantage.

“It’s always difficult to see some programs leaving your town, but any time you’re involved in business you have to look at the customer base and what your market demands, and I’m glad (the college administration) did that,” he said.

Byrnes said because of the way the construction industry is evolving, the centre for heavy equipment training is in line with current and future trends.

“The college is positioning Stephenville for the future and I’m pleased with that direction,” he said.

Byrnes said the Town of Stephenville’s strategic economic plan recognized two priorities, the first focusing on Stephenville as a “college town” and the other on tourism. He said these changes fall in line with those plans and the business community is pleased to work with the college to meet that demand.

Twitter: WS_FrankGale

College tries to strike good balance with community: Vaughan

While the College of the North Atlantic’s Bay St. George campus expects to see an influx of new students through the creation of a heavy equipment industrial trades centre, the college is losing some of its programming to St. John’s.

College president Ann Marie Vaughan said Friday that a newly created centre for media arts will mean programs like music industry and performance, sound recording and production, video game art and design, journalism, graphic design and graphic communications will move to college’s Prince Phillip Drive campus in the capital city.

Vaughan said there has been a decline in enrollment in media arts programs in Stephenville, and through consultations with students, instructors and people in the industry, it was felt the shift to St. John’s would allow students make better industry connections.

“We need to balance what’s in the best interest of the students, employers and community,” Vaughan told the Bay St. George Chamber of Commerce on Friday.

With the creation of the heavy equipment industrial trades centre in Stephenville, however, the college expects 250-300 more students and nine new positions, mainly in programs like mobile crane operator, heavy equipment operator, heavy duty equipment technician/truck and transport mechanic and commercial driver/Class 3 driver.

Vaughan said the facilities for this type of training exist in Stephenville, and there will be significant net gains to the community in building retrofits, increased fuel purchases and capital equipment purchases.

Twitter: WS_FrankGale

Byrnes, the president of the Bay St. George Chamber of Commerce, made the comment following an address by Ann Marie Vaughan, the college’s president and chief executive officer, to the chamber Friday.

Vaughan told those in attendance that two “centres of excellence” are being created, including one for heavy equipment industrial trades and the other for media arts programs. It will mean training opportunities for 250-300 more students at the Bay St. George campus, she said, and nine new positions will be created in Stephenville, mainly in the heavy equipment programs.

The creation of the media arts centre, however, will mean some programs at Bay St. George campus will be moving to the college’s campus in St. John’s. Vaughn said college administration met with all instructors of the affected programs and they are well aware of what’s taking place and were actually part of the process.

Byrnes said the business community will see an immediate impact from the extra students, while additional administration positions at campus headquarters in Stephenville will be another advantage.

“It’s always difficult to see some programs leaving your town, but any time you’re involved in business you have to look at the customer base and what your market demands, and I’m glad (the college administration) did that,” he said.

Byrnes said because of the way the construction industry is evolving, the centre for heavy equipment training is in line with current and future trends.

“The college is positioning Stephenville for the future and I’m pleased with that direction,” he said.

Byrnes said the Town of Stephenville’s strategic economic plan recognized two priorities, the first focusing on Stephenville as a “college town” and the other on tourism. He said these changes fall in line with those plans and the business community is pleased to work with the college to meet that demand.

Twitter: WS_FrankGale

College tries to strike good balance with community: Vaughan

While the College of the North Atlantic’s Bay St. George campus expects to see an influx of new students through the creation of a heavy equipment industrial trades centre, the college is losing some of its programming to St. John’s.

College president Ann Marie Vaughan said Friday that a newly created centre for media arts will mean programs like music industry and performance, sound recording and production, video game art and design, journalism, graphic design and graphic communications will move to college’s Prince Phillip Drive campus in the capital city.

Vaughan said there has been a decline in enrollment in media arts programs in Stephenville, and through consultations with students, instructors and people in the industry, it was felt the shift to St. John’s would allow students make better industry connections.

“We need to balance what’s in the best interest of the students, employers and community,” Vaughan told the Bay St. George Chamber of Commerce on Friday.

With the creation of the heavy equipment industrial trades centre in Stephenville, however, the college expects 250-300 more students and nine new positions, mainly in programs like mobile crane operator, heavy equipment operator, heavy duty equipment technician/truck and transport mechanic and commercial driver/Class 3 driver.

Vaughan said the facilities for this type of training exist in Stephenville, and there will be significant net gains to the community in building retrofits, increased fuel purchases and capital equipment purchases.

Twitter: WS_FrankGale

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