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A reminder from Sheilagh


Weather was 'the' story on the Burin Peninsula last week. A myth unique to Newfoundland, many people call it 'Sheilagh's Brush' - the first major snowstorm after St. Patrick's Day.

Weather was 'the' story on the Burin Peninsula last week.
A myth unique to Newfoundland, many people call it 'Sheilagh's Brush' - the first major snowstorm after St. Patrick's Day.
Sheilagh is said to be St. Patrick's wife, sweeping the last snow out of heaven for the winter, which comes down to us in the form of a storm. Boy, was this one a real doozy!
She certainly didn't waste a second this time around.
Technically, the storm started on St. Patrick's Day itself, and then it carried over into the next day, and the day after, pelting the Burin Peninsula with snow and freezing rain combined with very high winds.
It all made for a very messy, and dangerous situation, especially for those on the peninsula's highways.
After a period of rain, rain and more rain, most of the snow in the region had disappeared earlier this month, leaving many to think winter might be done with for the most part for another year.
Think again!
By the time the storm was over, and the two within a week preceding it, winter had once again reared its head and transformed the area with a coat of white. It certainly served as a reminder of who's the boss out there.
Snow from the storm blocked many roads in the area, including our very lifeline to the rest of the province for two days.
Nothing could get on or off the Burin Peninsula while crews from the Department of Transportation and Works fought to open the highway.
It also served as a good reminder to residents of the peninsula we are in many ways isolated from the rest of the province. That shouldn't be a bad thing. It should bring us closer together.
Certainly, kidney dialysis patients in the region must have felt very relieved the new unit had finally been installed at the Burin Peninsula Health Care Centre earlier this year!
Government did a good job there, and they must continue to do so to ensure we don't have to rely on St. John's and other areas of the province to provide us the necessities of life.
A dentist from the mainland expressed an interest in setting up a practice in the Marystown-area last week - something the region desperately needs, and doesn't come along every day.
He's looking to the government to help make it happen. Let's hope they don't drop the ball.

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