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Marystown council pleased with restored summer festival despite $12,390 loss

Peter Kiewit sponsored activities for children on Marystown Day during the 2018 Marystown Shining Seas Summer Festival. Wet weather forced the event inside Kaetlyn Osmond Arena.
Peter Kiewit sponsored activities for children on Marystown Day during the 2018 Marystown Shining Seas Summer Festival. Wet weather forced the event inside Kaetlyn Osmond Arena. - Paul Herridge

MARYSTOWN, N.L.

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

CANADA

This year’s Marystown Shining Seas Summer Festival has been deemed a success even though it didn’t turn a profit.

That was not the primary intention anyway, tourism and special events committee chair Deputy Mayor Gary Myles said, in presenting the financial report from the weeklong festival in August during Marystown council’s Oct. 2 meeting.

“We wanted to provide the town with a festival, not have a festival to see how much money we could raise, and I think we did that,” Myles said.

“I’ll be the first to admit there are things that we will look at doing different, but that’s how you grow, that’s how things move forward, that’s how things improve.”

According to the report, the town took in total revenues of $14,765 against expenditures of $27,155 for an overall loss of $12,390.

The Big Splash concert on Aug. 11 featuring John Boy and Racquel, the Coastals and headliners the Fables accounted for most of the red ink. The town paid $17,064 for the bands plus another $1,022 for accommodations and $1,000 for security. Bar expenses during the concert were $2,542. Other miscellaneous costs added roughly another $1,000 to the event.

The town took in $6,824 from ticket sales for the event along with $4,189 in bar sales for a total of $11,013.

The town made a profit of $1,183 on the weeklong 50/50 draw. The sold-out pig roast cost $989 to put off and brought in $1,215. The town spent $604 on the mayor’s breakfast.

The current council regime brought Shining Seas back for 2018 after it had been dormant for a few years.

“I think part of the rationale for the deficit is that we provided so many free activities,” Mayor Sam Synard said.

“In fact, very few activities had any financial attachment to them. The concert did and a few others did. Other than that, this was very much a community-based, free summer festival.”

Peter Kiewit was a major sponsor of the festival, Myles acknowledged, allowing some events to be offered at no cost.

Myles pointed out participation by residents during the festival was high and feedback was very positive. A number of community groups benefited by hosting their own events as fundraisers during the week, as well, he added.

“All in all, I think it was more of a success than it was anything else and we’ve got something to build on,” Myles said.

paul.herridge@southerngazette.ca

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